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J Psychosom Res. 2012 Jul;73(1):35-41. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2012.04.006. Epub 2012 May 14.

Changes in social support within the early recovery period and outcomes after acute myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine, 2 Church Street South, New Haven, CT 06519, United States. erica.leifheit-limson@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine changes in social support during early recovery after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and determine whether these changes influence outcomes within the first year.

METHODS:

Among 1951 AMI patients enrolled in a 19-center prospective study, we examined changes in social support between baseline (index hospitalization) and 1 month post-AMI to longitudinally assess their association with health status and depressive symptoms within the first year. We further examined whether 1-month support predicted outcomes independent of baseline support. Hierarchical repeated-measures regression evaluated associations, adjusting for site, baseline outcome level, baseline depressive symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics, and clinical factors.

RESULTS:

During the first month of recovery, 5.6% of patients had persistently low support, 6.4% had worsened support, 8.1% had improved support, and 80.0% had persistently high support. In risk-adjusted analyses, patients with worsened support (vs. persistently high) had greater risk of angina (relative risk=1.46), lower disease-specific quality of life (β=7.44), lower general mental functioning (β=4.82), and more depressive symptoms (β=1.94) (all p≤.01). Conversely, patients with improved support (vs. persistently low) had better outcomes, including higher disease-specific quality of life (β=6.78), higher general mental functioning (β=4.09), and fewer depressive symptoms (β=1.48) (all p≤.002). In separate analyses, low support at 1 month was significantly associated with poorer outcomes, independent of baseline support level (all p≤.002).

CONCLUSION:

Changes in social support during early AMI recovery were not uncommon and were important for predicting outcomes. Intervening on low support during early recovery may provide a means of improving outcomes.

PMID:
22691557
PMCID:
PMC3374926
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpsychores.2012.04.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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