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Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2012 May;13(3):e176-80. doi: 10.1097/PCC.0b013e3182389548.

Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in a pediatric intensive care unit: effect of the location of catheter insertion.

Author information

1
Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Children's Acute Transport Service, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the rate of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections between pediatric intensive care unit admissions where central venous catheters were inserted within the same hospital (internal central venous catheters) and those where central venous catheters were inserted before transfer from other hospitals (external central venous catheters).

DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data.

SETTING:

A tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit in London, UK.

PATIENTS:

Consecutive pediatric intensive care unit admissions between May 2007 and March 2009.

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Catheter-associated bloodstream infections were identified using a widely accepted surveillance definition. The rate and time to occurrence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection were compared between internal and external nontunneled central venous catheters. A multilevel Cox-regression model was used to study the association between location of central venous catheter insertion and time to catheter-associated bloodstream infection. In total, 382 central venous catheters were studied (245 internal; 137 external) accounting for a total of 1,737 central venous catheter days. There was a higher catheter-associated bloodstream infection incidence density among external central venous catheters (23.1 [95% confidence interval 11.0-35.2] vs. 9.7 [95% confidence interval 3.9-15.5] per 1,000 catheter-days). Multivariable analyses demonstrated higher infection risk with external central venous catheters (hazard ratio 2.65 [95% confidence interval 1.18-5.96]) despite adjustment for confounding variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

The rate of catheter-associated bloodstream infections in the pediatric intensive care unit is significantly affected by external insertion of the central venous catheter. Future interventions to reduce nosocomial infections on pediatric intensive care units will need to be specifically targeted at this high-risk patient group.

PMID:
22561276
DOI:
10.1097/PCC.0b013e3182389548
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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