Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Alzheimers Dement. 2012;8(2):95-104. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2010.12.009.

Intraindividual cognitive decline using a brief computerized cognitive screening test.

Author information

1
CogState Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ddarby@cogstate.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Progressive intraindividual decline in memory and cognition is characteristic of dementia and may be useful in detecting very early Alzheimer's disease pathology.

METHODS:

This study evaluated the slopes of cognitive performance over a 12-month period in 263 healthy, community-dwelling, adult volunteers aged ≥50 years. Participants completed a brief computerized battery of cognitive tests (CogState) at baseline and during 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up assessments. Linear mixed models were used to estimate age-adjusted mean slopes and 95% confidence intervals of change for each of the cognitive measures.

RESULTS:

By defining age-adjusted mean slopes, and 95% confidence intervals for a measure of episodic memory, individuals with greater than expected decline (equal to or lower than the fifth percentile level of decline) were identified. From these, four individuals completed a full medical, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, with none of them fulfilling criteria for mild cognitive impairment, but three (75%) having positive amyloid-positron emission tomographic scans.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intraindividual decline in cognitive performance can be detected in otherwise healthy, community-dwelling, older persons, and this may deserve further study as a potential indicator of early Alzheimer's disease pathology.

PMID:
22404851
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2010.12.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center