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Items: 5

1.

Common gene rearrangements in prostate cancer.

Rubin MA, Maher CA, Chinnaiyan AM.

J Clin Oncol. 2011 Sep 20;29(27):3659-68. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2011.35.1916. Epub 2011 Aug 22. Review.

2.

An integrated network of androgen receptor, polycomb, and TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions in prostate cancer progression.

Yu J, Yu J, Mani RS, Cao Q, Brenner CJ, Cao X, Wang X, Wu L, Li J, Hu M, Gong Y, Cheng H, Laxman B, Vellaichamy A, Shankar S, Li Y, Dhanasekaran SM, Morey R, Barrette T, Lonigro RJ, Tomlins SA, Varambally S, Qin ZS, Chinnaiyan AM.

Cancer Cell. 2010 May 18;17(5):443-54. doi: 10.1016/j.ccr.2010.03.018.

3.

Induced chromosomal proximity and gene fusions in prostate cancer.

Mani RS, Tomlins SA, Callahan K, Ghosh A, Nyati MK, Varambally S, Palanisamy N, Chinnaiyan AM.

Science. 2009 Nov 27;326(5957):1230. doi: 10.1126/science.1178124. Epub 2009 Oct 29.

4.

Recurrent gene fusions in prostate cancer.

Kumar-Sinha C, Tomlins SA, Chinnaiyan AM.

Nat Rev Cancer. 2008 Jul;8(7):497-511. doi: 10.1038/nrc2402. Epub 2008 Jun 19. Review.

5.

Distinct classes of chromosomal rearrangements create oncogenic ETS gene fusions in prostate cancer.

Tomlins SA, Laxman B, Dhanasekaran SM, Helgeson BE, Cao X, Morris DS, Menon A, Jing X, Cao Q, Han B, Yu J, Wang L, Montie JE, Rubin MA, Pienta KJ, Roulston D, Shah RB, Varambally S, Mehra R, Chinnaiyan AM.

Nature. 2007 Aug 2;448(7153):595-9.

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