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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Sep;9(9):793-9. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2011.04.024. Epub 2011 May 5.

Quality of life improves for pediatric patients after total pancreatectomy and islet autotransplant for chronic pancreatitis.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. bell0130@umn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Total pancreatectomy (TP) and islet autotransplant (IAT) have been used to treat patients with painful chronic pancreatitis. Initial studies indicated that most patients experienced significant pain relief, but there were few validated measures of quality of life. We investigated whether health-related quality of life improved among pediatric patients undergoing TP/IAT.

METHODS:

Nineteen consecutive children (aged 5-18 years) undergoing TP/IAT from December 2006 to December 2009 at the University of Minnesota completed the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (SF-36) health questionnaire before and after surgery. Insulin requirements were recorded.

RESULTS:

Before TP/IAT, patients had below average health-related quality of life, based on data from the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36; they had a mean physical component summary (PCS) score of 30 and mental component summary (MCS) score of 34 (2 and 1.5 standard deviations, respectively, below the mean for the US population). By 1 year after surgery, PCS and MCS scores improved to 50 and 46, respectively (global effect, PCS P < .001, MCS P = .06). Mean scores improved for all 8 component subscales. More than 60% of IAT recipients were insulin independent or required minimal insulin. Patients with prior surgical drainage procedures (Puestow) had lower yields of islets (P = .01) and greater incidence of insulin dependence (P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Quality of life (physical and emotional components) significantly improve after TP/IAT in subsets of pediatric patients with severe chronic pancreatitis. Minimal or no insulin was required for most patients, although islet yield was reduced in patients with previous surgical drainage operations.

PMID:
21683160
PMCID:
PMC3163759
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2011.04.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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