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Lancet Infect Dis. 2011 Jun;11(6):455-63. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(11)70027-5. Epub 2011 Apr 12.

From tailor-made to ready-to-wear meningococcal B vaccines: longitudinal study of a clonal meningococcal B outbreak.

Author information

1
Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital Charles Nicolle, Université de Rouen (EA2656, INSERM U657), Rouen, France.

Erratum in

  • Lancet Infect Dis. 2011 Jul;11(7):495.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Outer-membrane-vesicle vaccines for meningococcal B outbreaks are complex and time consuming to develop. We studied the use of already available vaccine to control an outbreak caused by a genetically close strain.

METHODS:

From 2006 to 2009, all individuals younger than 20 years living in the region of Normandy, France, in which an outbreak caused by a B:14:P1.7,16 strain occurred, were eligible to receive MenBvac, a Norwegian vaccine designed 20 years earlier against a strain sharing the same serosubtype (B:15:P1.7,16). The immunogenicity (in a randomly selected cohort of 400 children aged 1-5 years), safety, and epidemiological effect of the vaccination were assessed.

FINDINGS:

26,014 individuals were eligible to receive the vaccine. Shortage of vaccine production prompted start of the campaign in the highest incidence groups (1-5 years). 16,709 (64%) received a complete vaccination schedule of whom 13,589 (81%) received a 2+1 dose schedule (week 0, week 6, and month 8). At 6 weeks after the third dose, of 235 vaccinees for whom samples were available, 206 (88%) had a seroresponse, and 108 (56 %) of 193 had a seroresponse at 15 months. These results were similar to those described for tailor-made vaccines and their homologous strain. Only previously described adverse effects occurred. The incidence of B:14:P1.7,16 cases decreased significantly in the vaccine targeted population after the primary vaccination period (from 31·6 per 100,000 to 5·9 per 100,000; p=0·001).

INTERPRETATION:

The ready-to-wear approach is reliable if epidemic and vaccine strains are genetically close. Other meningococcal B clonal outbreaks might benefit from this strategy; and previously described outer-membrane-vesicle vaccines can be effective against various strains.

FUNDING:

French Ministry of Health.

PMID:
21489881
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(11)70027-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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