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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2011 Jun;110(6):1510-8. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01226.2010. Epub 2011 Feb 10.

Responsiveness of the human airway in vitro during deep inspiration and tidal oscillation.

Author information

1
Div. of Clinical Sciences, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, 100 Roberts Rd., Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia 6008. Peter.Noble@uwa.edu.au

Abstract

In healthy individuals, deep inspiration produces bronchodilation and reduced airway responsiveness, which may be a response of the airway wall to mechanical stretch. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro response of isolated human airways to the dynamic mechanical stretch associated with normal breathing. Human bronchial segments (n = 6) were acquired from patients without airflow obstruction undergoing lung resection for pulmonary neoplasms. The side branches were ligated and the airways were mounted in an organ bath chamber. Airway narrowing to cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine (3 × 10(-6) M to 3 × 10(-3) M) was measured under static conditions and in the presence of "tidal" oscillations with intermittent "deep inspiration." Respiratory maneuvers were simulated by varying transmural pressure using a motor-controlled syringe pump (tidal 5 to 10 cmH(2)O at 0.25 Hz, deep inspiration 5 to 30 cmH(2)O). Airway narrowing was determined from decreases in lumen volume. Tidal oscillation had no effect on airway responses to acetylcholine which was similar to those under static conditions. Deep inspiration in tidally oscillating, acetylcholine-contracted airways produced potent, transient (<1 min) bronchodilation, ranging from full reversal in airway narrowing at low acetylcholine concentrations to ∼50% reversal at the highest concentration. This resulted in a temporary reduction in maximal airway response (P < 0.001), without a change in sensitivity to acetylcholine. Our findings are that the mechanical stretch of human airways produced by physiological transmural pressures generated during deep inspiration produces bronchodilation and a transient reduction in airway responsiveness, which can explain the beneficial effects of deep inspiration in bronchial provocation testing in vivo.

PMID:
21310892
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.01226.2010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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