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Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(1):23-34. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2011.521069.

Cognitive function and treatment response in a randomized clinical trial of computer-based training in cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Author information

1
Division of Substance Abuse, Yale University School of Medicine, 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. Kathleen.carroll@yale.edu

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), because of its comparatively high level of cognitive demand, is likely to be challenging for substance users with limitations in cognitive function. However, it is not known whether computer-assisted versions of CBT will be particularly helpful (e.g., allowing individualized pace and repetition) or difficult (e.g., via complexity of computerized delivery) for such patients. In this secondary analysis of data collected from a randomized clinical trial evaluating computer-assisted CBT, four aspects of cognitive functioning were evaluated among 77 participants. Those with higher levels of risk taking completed fewer sessions and homework assignments and had poorer substance use outcomes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00350610.

PMID:
21190403
PMCID:
PMC3083447
DOI:
10.3109/10826084.2011.521069
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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