Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
AIDS Behav. 2011 Oct;15(7):1527-38. doi: 10.1007/s10461-010-9842-5.

The skinny on sexual risk: the effects of BMI on STI incidence and risk.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Trace.Kershaw@yale.edu

Abstract

Few studies examine the influence of body mass index (BMI) on sexual risk. The purpose of this study was to determine whether BMI among 704 young mothers (ages 14-25) related to STI incidence and sexual risk. We examined the effect of BMI groups (normal weight, overweight, and obese) at 6 months postpartum on STI incidence and risky sex (e.g., unprotected sex, multiple partners, risky and casual partner) at 12 months postpartum. At 6 months postpartum, 31% of participants were overweight and 40% were obese. Overweight women were more likely to have an STI (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.11-2.89, P < .05) and a risky partner (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.01-2.08, P < .05) at 12 months postpartum compared to normal weight women. However, obese women were less likely to have an STI than normal weight women (OR = .57, 95% CI = .34-.96, P < .01). BMI related to STI incidence and sexual risk behavior. Integrated approaches to weight loss and sexual risk prevention should be explored.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00271960.

PMID:
20976536
PMCID:
PMC3158959
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-010-9842-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center