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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Jan;204(1):52.e1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.08.028. Epub 2010 Oct 25.

Gestational weight gain and subsequent postpartum weight loss among young, low-income, ethnic minority women.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Document weight change trajectories that lead to gestational weight gain or postpartum weight loss outside clinical recommendations established by the Institute of Medicine.

STUDY DESIGN:

Women aged 14-25 receiving prenatal care and delivering singleton infants at term (n = 427). Medical record review and 4 structured interviews conducted: second and third trimester, 6- and 12-months postpartum. Longitudinal mixed modeling to evaluate weight change trajectories.

RESULTS:

Only 22% of participants gained gestational weight within Institute of Medicine guidelines. There were 62% that exceeded maximum recommendations-more common among those overweight/obese (body mass index ≥25.0; P < .0001). 52% retained ≥10 lb 1-year postpartum. Increased weight gain and retention documented among smokers and women with pregnancy-induced hypertension; breastfeeding promoted postpartum weight loss (all P < .02). Body mass index by race interaction suggested healthier outcomes for Latinas (P = .02).

CONCLUSION:

Excessive pregnancy weight gain and inadequate postpartum weight loss are highly prevalent among young low-income ethnic minority women. Pregnancy and postpartum are critical junctures for weight management interventions.

PMID:
20974459
PMCID:
PMC3011029
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2010.08.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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