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Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Nov;12(11):1172-5. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntq163. Epub 2010 Oct 1.

Effect of binge eating on treatment outcomes for smoking cessation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 208098, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. marney.white@yale.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study investigated the effect of binge eating on smoking cessation outcomes.

METHODS:

Participants (n = 186) reported binge eating status at baseline and at a 6-week postquit evaluation during a larger clinical trial for smoking cessation. Binge eating was defined with a single self-report questionnaire item from the Dieting and Bingeing Severity Scale. Participant groups defined by binge eating status were compared on abstinence rates.

RESULTS:

Among participants, 22% reported binge eating at baseline, 17% denied binge eating at baseline but endorsed binge eating by 6 weeks, and 61% denied binge eating at both timepoints. Participants who reported binge eating prior to or during treatment had lower quit rates at 6-week postquit and at the 24-week follow-up point than those without binge eating; the groups did not differ at the 12-week follow-up point. The group that experienced an emergence of binge eating reported significantly more weight gain than the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that treatments addressing problematic eating behaviors during smoking cessation are warranted.

PMID:
20889472
PMCID:
PMC2964923
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntq163
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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