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Acad Med. 2010 Sep;85(9):1462-9. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181eac9a3.

Simulation training in central venous catheter insertion: improved performance in clinical practice.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. leigh.evans@yale.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine whether simulation training of ultrasound (US)-guided central venous catheter (CVC) insertion skills on a partial task trainer improves cannulation and insertion success rates in clinical practice.

METHOD:

This prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind study of first- and second-year residents occurred at a tertiary care teaching hospital from January 2007 to September 2008. The intervention group (n = 90) received a didactic and hands-on, competency-based simulation training course in US-guided CVC insertion, whereas the control group (n = 95) received training through a traditional, bedside apprenticeship model. Success at first cannulation and successful CVC insertion served as the primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included reduction in technical errors and decreased mechanical complications.

RESULTS:

Blinded independent raters observed 495 CVC insertions by 115 residents over a 21-month period. Successful first cannulation occurred in 51% of the intervention group versus 37% of the control group (P = .03). CVC insertion success occurred for 78% of the intervention group versus 67% of the control group (P = .02). Simulation training was independently and significantly associated with success at first cannulation (odds ratio: 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-2.8) and with successful CVC insertion (odds ratio: 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-2.8)--both independent of US use, patient comorbidities, or resident specialty. No significant differences related to technical errors or mechanical complications existed between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Simulation training was associated with improved in-hospital performance of CVC insertion. Procedural simulation was associated with improved residents' skills and was more effective than traditional training.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00919308.

PMID:
20736674
DOI:
10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181eac9a3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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