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J Gen Intern Med. 2010 Jul;25(7):670-4. doi: 10.1007/s11606-010-1306-0. Epub 2010 Mar 6.

Effect of incarceration history on outcomes of primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. emily.wang@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Behaviors associated with opioid dependence often involve criminal activity, which can lead to incarceration. The impact of a history of incarceration on outcomes in primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone is not known.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study is to determine whether having a history of incarceration affects response to primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone treatment.

DESIGN:

In this post hoc secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial, we compared demographic, clinical characteristics, and treatment outcomes among 166 participants receiving primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone treatment stratifying on history of incarceration.

MAIN RESULTS:

Participants with a history of incarceration have similar treatment outcomes with primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone than those without a history of incarceration (consecutive weeks of opioid-negative urine samples, 6.2 vs. 5.9, p = 0.43; treatment retention, 38% vs. 46%, p = 0.28).

CONCLUSIONS:

Prior history of incarceration does not appear to impact primary care office-based treatment of opioid dependence with buprenorphine/naloxone. Community health care providers can be reassured that initiating buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid dependent individuals with a history of incarceration will have similar outcomes as those without this history.

PMID:
20213205
PMCID:
PMC2881960
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-010-1306-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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