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J Glob Oncol. 2018 Jul;4:1-16. doi: 10.1200/JGO.17.00207.

Are Global Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality Patterns Related to Country-Specific Economic Development and Prevention Strategies?

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1
Martine Bellanger, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sante Publique - University Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France; Nur Zeinomar, Prisa Tehranifar, and Mary Beth Terry, Columbia University; Parisa Tehranifar and Mary Beth Terry, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; and Martine Bellanger, Nur Zeinomar, Parisa Tehranifar, and Mary Beth Terry, International Breast Cancer and Nutrition Project, Lafayette, IN.

Abstract

Purpose There remains considerable international variation in breast cancer incidence and mortality, but a comprehensive examination of rates by country level economic, development and cancer prevention policies is lacking. Materials and Methods We compared GLOBOCAN 2012 age-specific breast cancer incidence and mortality rates for 177 countries by using development and policy data available from the WHO Global Cancer Country Profiles data base. We classified each country on the basis of gross national income per capita from the World Development Indicators data base, as follows: low-income country (LIC), lower-middle-income country (LMIC), upper-middle-income country (UMIC), and high-income country (HIC). Results There were 1,651,326 breast cancer cases and 516,868 breast cancer deaths estimated in 2012. Approximately three quarters of all breast cancer cases and 60% of the breast cancer deaths were in women from HICs and UMICs. Age and country-level income explained approximately 60% of the international variation in breast cancer incidence and mortality in women of all ages (adjusted R2 = 58% and 60%, respectively). Economic development indicators additionally increased the overall variation in incidence and mortality by approximately 5%. In women younger than age 50 years, country-level income explained 68% of incidence and 59% of mortality; economic development indicators additionally increased this percentage by approximately 4%. Country-level cancer prevention policy indicators contributed little to explanation of the overall variation in incidence and mortality after analysis accounted for age and country-level income; however, an overall resource summary index of greater economic development and cancer prevention policies was related to lower mortality within each major income level. Conclusion Although breast cancer incidence increases with higher income levels in all ages, women in the poorest countries bear a relatively higher burden of breast cancer mortality, particularly women younger than age 50 years.

PMID:
30085889
PMCID:
PMC6223528
DOI:
10.1200/JGO.17.00207
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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