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Am J Addict. 2010 Jan-Feb;19(1):53-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1521-0391.2009.00003.x.

The association between cocaine use and treatment outcomes in patients receiving office-based buprenorphine/naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8093, USA. lynn.sullivan@yale.edu

Abstract

Cocaine use in patients receiving methadone is associated with worse treatment outcomes. The association between cocaine use and office-based buprenorphine/naloxone treatment outcomes is not known. We evaluated the association between baseline and in-treatment cocaine use, treatment retention, and urine toxicology results in 162 patients enrolled in a 24-week trial of primary care office-based buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance. Patients with baseline cocaine metabolite-negative urine toxicology tests compared with those with cocaine metabolite-positive tests had more mean weeks of treatment retention (18.3 vs. 15.8, p = .04), a greater percentage completed 24 weeks of treatment (50% vs. 33%, p = .04) and had a greater percentage of opioid-negative urines (47% vs. 34%, p = .02). Patients with in-treatment cocaine metabolite-negative urine toxicology tests compared with cocaine metabolite-positive patients had more mean weeks of treatment retention (19.0 vs. 16.5, p = .003), a greater percentage completed 24 weeks of treatment (60% vs. 30%, p < .001), and had a greater percentage of opioid-negative urines (51% vs. 35%, p = .001). We conclude that both baseline and in-treatment cocaine use is associated with worse treatment outcomes in patients receiving office-based buprenorphine/naloxone and may benefit from targeted interventions.

PMID:
20132122
PMCID:
PMC3107713
DOI:
10.1111/j.1521-0391.2009.00003.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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