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Pain Med. 2010 Mar;11(3):472-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00790.x. Epub 2010 Jan 22.

Comparison of cutaneous anesthetic effect of 8% lidocaine spray with lidocaine patch using current perception threshold test.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan. kanaiakifumi@aol.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

A lidocaine patch is often used for topical anesthesia prior to venipuncture, but needs to be applied for several hours before the puncture, and the site is fixed. A metered-dose lidocaine pump spray could be used to produce cutaneous topical anesthesia. In this study, we compared the anesthesia between the spray and the patch.

DESIGN:

Thirteen healthy male volunteers received three treatments of metered-dose 8% lidocaine spray, a lidocaine patch, and no application as control measurement, in a random order separated by at least 2 days. Each treatment was applied topically on the forearm. Sensory nerve fibers (Abeta, Adelta, and C fibers) were evaluated with a series of 5, 250, and 2,000 Hz stimuli using current perception threshold (CPT) before and 30 minutes after each application.

RESULTS:

Under the control condition, CPTs measured at baseline and at 30 minutes were similar for 2,000 and 250 Hz stimuli, but significantly reduced for 5 Hz stimulation at 30 minutes. Under patch application, CPTs for 2,000 and 250 Hz stimuli at 30 minutes after application were significantly higher than baseline, while CPTs for 5 Hz stimulation at baseline and 30 minutes after application were similar. Under spray application, CPTs for all stimuli at 30 minutes were significantly higher than baseline.

CONCLUSIONS:

Similar to the lidocaine patch, the lidocaine spray produces cutaneous weak anesthesia at 30 minutes after treatment. The spray seems to produce local anesthesia faster than the patch.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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