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J Surg Res. 2011 Jun 15;168(2):306-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2009.08.001. Epub 2009 Sep 4.

Differentiation of adult stem cells into smooth muscle for vascular tissue engineering.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Herein we evaluate the potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) to differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMC) and their potential for use in a tissue-engineered vascular graft.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We isolated ASC (CD13+29+90+) from the peri-umbilical adipose tissue of patients undergoing vascular surgery, and cultured them in media containing angiotensin II (AngII), sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), or transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1) for up to 3 weeks. SMC differentiation was assessed by (1) expression of early (calponin, caldesmon) and late (myosin heavy chain, MHC) SMC markers by RT-PCR, qPCR and Western blot, and (2) contraction upon plating on collagen gel. Differentiated ASCs were seeded onto a vascular graft (decellularized saphenous vein) within a bioreactor, and cell attachment was determined using confocal microscopy.

RESULTS:

Prior to differentiation, ASC expressed low levels of all three molecular markers. After culture in each differentiating medium, the extent of up-regulation of calponin, caldesmon, and MHC was variable across all cell lines. After seeding onto collagen gel, ASCs differentiated in SPC and TGFβ1 exhibit contractile properties, similar to smooth muscle cell controls. Differentiated stem cells adhered and proliferated on the vascular graft.

CONCLUSION:

These data suggest that human adipose-derived stem cells (1) exhibit variable expression of SMC molecular markers after differentiation, (2) exhibit a contractile phenotype after differentiation with SPC and TGFβ1, and (3) proliferate on a vascular graft scaffold. Thus, ASCs are potentially useful in the construction of autologous arteries.

PMID:
19959190
PMCID:
PMC2888621
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2009.08.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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