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Int J Eat Disord. 2010 Sep;43(6):572-5. doi: 10.1002/eat.20729.

Self-reported weight gain following smoking cessation: a function of binge eating behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. marney.white@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study investigated patterns of self-reported weight gain following smoking cessation among overweight individuals with and without binge eating.

METHOD:

Participants were 103 overweight (BMI ≥ 25) community volunteers who completed a battery of questionnaires online. Key items queried smoking cessation history and weight gain in the year following cessation. Participants were classified as nonbinge eating overweight (NBO, n = 56) or binge eating disorder (BED, n = 47).

RESULTS:

BED participants were significantly more likely to report weight gain in the year following smoking cessation than NBO participants. After controlling for current BMI, the amount of self-reported weight gain following smoking cessation differed significantly between groups, with the NBO group reporting an average gain of 5.0 kg and the BED group reporting 11.2-kg gain.

DISCUSSION:

Since many individuals resume smoking due to cessation-associated weight gain, these findings highlight the need for targeted interventions for overweight individuals particularly those who also binge eat.

PMID:
19718662
PMCID:
PMC2895960
DOI:
10.1002/eat.20729
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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