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J Emerg Med. 2011 Jan;40(1):e1-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2007.11.095. Epub 2008 Oct 23.

Identification of subcutaneous myiasis using bedside emergency physician performed ultrasound.

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1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Subcutaneous myiasis, a maggot infiltration of human tissue, is common in tropical countries. However, physicians in the United States may be unlikely to consider this etiology of dermatologic abnormalities even when a travel history suggests the diagnosis should be included in the differential.

CASE REPORT:

We report the case of a patient who returned from Sierra Leone with an infestation of a maggot of Cordylobia anthropophaga (tumbu fly) that was diagnosed and appropriately treated based on ultrasound findings.

CONCLUSION:

As international travel increases, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for tumbu fly infestation in returned travelers from endemic areas. The increasing use of ultrasound in the Emergency Department for evaluation of skin and soft tissue infections may aid the physician in making the diagnosis of subcutaneous myiasis.

PMID:
18947960
DOI:
10.1016/j.jemermed.2007.11.095
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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