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Biol Res Nurs. 2008 Jul;10(1):34-43.

An aerobic weight-loaded pilot exercise intervention for breast cancer survivors: bone remodeling and body composition outcomes.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Nursing, 100 Church Street South, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. tish.knobf@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Weight gain and bone loss are commonly reported in breast cancer survivors. The purpose of this pilot study is to assess feasibility and explore the effect of an aerobic weight-loaded exercise intervention on bone remodeling, weight, and body composition.

DESIGN:

A one-group pre-posttest design was used to test a 16-24-week supervised walking exercise intervention among women within 2 years of menopause. Through Weeks 1-4, time and weight were progressively increased. By Week 5 and through the end of the intervention, a waist belt was loaded with 5 lb and participants spent 45 min on the treadmill 3 times/week. Bone remodeling was measured by serum biomarkers (N-terminal propeptides of type I collagen [NTX] and serum osteocalcin). Dual-energy absorptiometry scans assessed body composition. Data were collected at baseline and 16 and 24 weeks.

RESULTS:

The majority of the 26 participants were married, well educated, and employed, with a mean age of 51.3 years (SD = 6.2). The high adherence (M = 88.2%, SD = 6.8) demonstrated feasibility. There were no significant changes in serum osteocalcin (p = .67), serum NTX (p = .31), lean muscle mass (p = .08), or percent fat mass for the group as a whole (p = .14), but fat mass increased for women on adjuvant endocrine therapy (p = .04). The women maintained their weight.

CONCLUSIONS:

This novel exercise intervention for breast cancer survivors was feasible, and women otherwise at high risk for weight gain and bone loss maintained their weight and bone mass.

PMID:
18705153
PMCID:
PMC3540790
DOI:
10.1177/1099800408320579
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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