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AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2008 Jun;22(6):449-57. doi: 10.1089/apc.2007.0199.

Hepatitis C protease and polymerase inhibitors in development.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 300 Cedar Street, S169, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. gustine.liu-young@yale.edu

Abstract

Hepatitis C infection (HCV) remains a global problem and the current anti-HCV therapies available in the clinic have sustained virologic response rates (SVR) of only about 50%, especially in HCV genotype 1-infected subjects. The SVR is even lower in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, estimated at only about 30-40%. However, exciting new research is under way to find new anti-HCV therapies. Presently, efforts to develop new anti-HCV agents for HCV-infected persons who fail pegylated interferon and ribavirin-based therapies have focused on inhibitors of key HCV enzymes such as the HCV NS3 protease and the NS5B polymerase. There are two protease inhibitors, telaprevir (VX-950, Vertex) and boceprevir (SCH 503034, Schering-Plough); and three polymerase inhibitors, valopicitabine (NM283, Idenix), R1626 (Roche), and HCV-796 (Viropharma) that have advanced to late-stage clinical trials. Of these aforementioned agents, telaprevir is the most advanced in clinical development. Early trial results on efficacy, safety, and HCV drug-resistance profiles of these novel agents will be discussed in this review paper.

PMID:
18479202
PMCID:
PMC2928549
DOI:
10.1089/apc.2007.0199
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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