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J Pharm Sci. 2008 Aug;97(8):3356-66.

Cospray dried antibiotics for dry powder lung delivery.

Author information

1
Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy (A15), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the potential of delivering a combination antibiotic therapy, containing doxycycline and ciprofloxacin (both hydrochloride) as a dry powder (DPI) formulation for inhalation. Single and combination antibiotics were produced by spray drying. Particle size distributions were characterized by laser diffraction and imaging conducted by scanning electron microscopy. Solid-state characterisation of the antibiotics was carried out using differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic vapour sorption, X-ray powder diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Using the Aerolizer device, the aerosol performance was measured using multistage liquid impinger and analysed using high performance liquid chromatography (R(2) = 1.0, CV = 0.4-1.0%). Furthermore, a disk diffusion test was performed for the assessment of the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the raw and spray dried antibiotics against bacteria. Results showed that cospray drying of the ciprofloxacin and doxycycline produced an antibiotic formulation (in a 1:1 ratio) suitable for inhalation that showed to be physically more stable then the analogous single spray dried antibiotic. The cospray dried powder has improved dispersion over the less stable single spray dried ciprofloxacin. The spray dried antibiotics were observed to have similar antimicrobial activity to the original antibiotics for Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pyrogenes, suggesting the spray drying process does not affect the anti-bacterial activity of the drug. Cospray dried antibiotics from a DPI is thus feasible and can potentially be an attractive delivery alternative to the more conventional systemic delivery route.

PMID:
17990305
DOI:
10.1002/jps.21239
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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