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Neuroepidemiology. 2007;28(3):186-90. Epub 2007 Aug 16.

Dietary fish or seafood consumption is not related to cerebrovascular disease risk in twin veterans.

Author information

1
Clinical Epidemiology Research Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CN 06516, USA. Dawn.Bravata@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

The results of studies about dietary fish consumption and stroke risk have been conflicting. We sought to examine the relationship between dietary fish and seafood consumption and the risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).

METHODS:

We used data from the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry, a prospective cohort of white male twins born in the US (1917-1927). Participants were asked about fish and seafood consumption in 1972 and 1985. Self-report or death-certificate report of stroke or TIA was obtained in 1996-1998.

RESULTS:

Among 5,355 participants, 579 (10.8%) had a stroke or TIA. In unmatched analyses, dietary fish and seafood consumption was not associated with stroke or TIA: 10.4% (91/872) of frequent fish or seafood consumers had a stroke or TIA versus 10.9% (488/4,483) of infrequent consumers, p = 0.70. In an analysis of matched twin pairs, frequent fish or seafood consumption was also not associated with stroke or TIA: hazard ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.59-1.36.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data, from a prospective cohort of white male twins, do not support an association between dietary fish and seafood consumption and stroke or TIA.

Comment in

PMID:
17703102
DOI:
10.1159/000107277
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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