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Curr Opin Pediatr. 2007 Feb;19(1):75-82.

Pediatric community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and colonization: trends and management.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8064, USA. Elijah.paintsil@yale.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The scourge of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pediatrics continues unabated. This review provides information on changes in epidemiology, therapeutic considerations, and measures to control the epidemic.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The epidemiology and clinical manifestations of methicillin-resistant S. aureus have undergone important changes that pose challenges in recognition, diagnosis, and treatment for the pediatrician. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus used to be predominantly associated with localized disease among previously healthy children; however, there are recent reports of more invasive and severe diseases with some fatalities. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern is also changing with some community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus having resistance patterns indistinguishable from that of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Thus the choice of antibiotics is becoming even more challenging in pediatrics, with an already-limited armamentarium of antibiotics. The management of common skin diseases such as furunculosis and boils now requires close collaboration between the general pediatrician and the infectious diseases specialist.

SUMMARY:

As the burden of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus disease continues to increase, pediatricians must have a high index of suspicion and must institute appropriate antimicrobial therapy based on community or regional antibiotic susceptibility of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. There is an urgent need for effective infection control programs, including active surveillance components, to help curb the epidemic.

PMID:
17224666
DOI:
10.1097/MOP.0b013e32801261c9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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