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J ECT. 2006 Sep;22(3):196-8.

Can cognitive behavioral therapy reduce relapse rates of depression after ECT? a preliminary study.

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1
Yale Depression Research Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this study was to explore the potential of providing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) after an index course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression to improve long-term outcome.

METHOD:

The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale were used to assess depression and treatment outcome for 6 patients who received 12 weeks of CBT after an index course and concurrent with a continuation course of ECT.

RESULTS:

Patients either maintained their response or showed decreased depressive symptoms at the 6-month post-index ECT evaluation. At the 9-month follow-up, 5 of 6 patients had BDI scores below their post-index ECT scores. The CGIs were rated "much improved" or "very much improved" by 5 patients at the termination of CBT. All 6 patients maintained or improved their CGIs at the 6-month follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results provide preliminary evidence that CBT after ECT is feasible and may extend the antidepressant effects ofECT.

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