Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Immunology. 2006 May;118(1):1-9.

Regulatory T cells in human disease and their potential for therapeutic manipulation.

Author information

1
Division of Infection, Immunity and Inflammatory Diseases, Guy's Hospital, King's College London, London, UK. leonie.taams@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

Regulatory T cells are proposed to play a central role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance in the periphery, and studies in many animal models demonstrate their capacity to inhibit inflammatory pathologies in vivo. At a recent meeting [Clinical Application of Regulatory T Cells, 7-8 April 2005, Horsham, UK, organized by the authors of this review, in collaboration with the British Society for Immunology and Novartis] evidence was discussed that certain human autoimmune, infectious and allergic diseases are associated with impaired regulatory T-cell function. In contrast, evidence from several human cancer studies and some infections indicates that regulatory T cells may impair the development of protective immunity. Importantly, certain therapies, both those that act non-specifically to reduce inflammation and antigen-specific immunotherapies, may induce or enhance regulatory T-cell function. The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge on regulatory T-cell function in human disease, and to assess critically how this can be tailored to suit the therapeutic manipulation of immunity.

PMID:
16630018
PMCID:
PMC1782265
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2567.2006.02348.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center