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J Clin Anesth. 2005 Sep;17(6):451-5.

Comparison of preoperative gastric contents and serum gastrin concentrations in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Samsung Cheil Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 100-380, South Korea. jenyhong@samsung.co.kr

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to compare the volume and the pH level of preoperative gastric contents and serum gastrin concentrations between pregnant and nonpregnant women.

DESIGN:

This prospective controlled study was conducted in a single blind manner.

PATIENTS:

One hundred pregnant women scheduled for elective cesarean delivery (pregnant group) and 100 nonpregnant women who underwent gynecologic surgery (nonpregnant group) were enrolled.

INTERVENTIONS:

Gastric content was aspirated gently with 14-F multiorificed nasogastric tube before the induction of anesthesia.

MEASUREMENTS:

The volume and the pH level of the aspirated gastric contents were measured, and serum gastrin concentration was measured by the double antibody gastrin method.

MAIN RESULTS:

The gastric volume in the pregnant group was greater than in the nonpregnant group (0.49 +/- 0.4 vs 0.24 +/- 0.2 mL/kg, P < .05). The gastric pH level in the pregnant group was lower than in the nonpregnant group (2.4 +/- 1.4 vs 3.0 +/- 1.9, P < .05). The number of patients at risk was 45 (45.5%) in the pregnant group and 16 (16.7%) in the nonpregnant group (P < .05). The serum gastrin levels of the 2 groups were not significantly different (32.1 +/- 12.3 vs 28.2 +/- 8.3 pg/mL). The preoperative anxiety level of the pregnant group was higher than in the nonpregnant group (4.4 +/- 2.1 vs 3.8 +/- 2.2, P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

We confirmed that pregnant women have much greater and more acidic gastric contents than the nonpregnant patients preoperatively, and it is not because of serum gastrin concentration.

PMID:
16171666
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinane.2004.10.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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