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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Jan;52(1):23-6.

The prevalence of psoriasis in African Americans: results from a population-based study.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology and Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, PA 19104, USA. Joel.Gelfand@uphs.upenn.edu <Joel.Gelfand@uphs.upenn.edu>

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Psoriasis is a common disease with substantial effects on quality of life. The prevalence of psoriasis in African Americans has been previously reported as rare. However, there have been no population-based studies to assess the prevalence and burden of psoriasis in African Americans.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to measure the prevalence and burden of psoriasis in African Americans compared with Caucasians.

METHODS:

Patients were randomly selected from the United States population and were asked standard demographic questions. Patients who reported a physician diagnosis of psoriasis were asked additional questions related to quality of life.

RESULTS:

The total sample included 27,220 individuals of which 21,921 were Caucasian and 2443 were African American. The prevalence of psoriasis was 2.5% in Caucasian patients and was 1.3% in African American patients. African Americans had an approximately 52% reduction in the prevalence of psoriasis compared with Caucasians ( P < .0001). African Americans and Caucasians had similar impacts on quality of life and treatment satisfaction based on single global questions.

CONCLUSION:

Although psoriasis is less common in African Americans than in Caucasians, it is not rare in either demographic and carries a substantial burden in both groups.

PMID:
15627076
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2004.07.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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