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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Dec;13(12):2096-105.

A prospective study of perceived susceptibility to breast cancer and nonadherence to mammography screening guidelines in African American and White women ages 40 to 79 years.

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1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

This prospective study examined the influence of perceived susceptibility to breast cancer on nonadherence to recommended mammography screening guidelines. The study population included 1,229 African American and White women ages 40 to 79 years who obtained an index mammography screening examination at one of five urban hospitals in Connecticut between October 1996 and January 1998. Information on perceived susceptibility to breast cancer and on multiple covariates was obtained by telephone interview on average 1.5 months after the index screening. Subsequent adherence to mammography screening guidelines was ascertained by follow-up interview on average 29 months after the index exam. Across race, age, and family breast cancer history, women who believed that their susceptibility was high (i.e., "very likely" to develop breast cancer) were less likely to adhere to screening guidelines than women who believed that their susceptibility was moderate [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.51-5.30], but the effect was stronger in older women. Women ages 40 to 49 years (but not ages 50-79 years) who believed that their susceptibility was low (i.e., "not likely" or "a little likely" to develop breast cancer) were also less likely to adhere to guidelines than those who reported moderate susceptibility (adjusted OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.66-5.68, and adjusted OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.63-4.73). In contrast to most previous studies that found a positive linear relationship between perceived susceptibility to breast cancer and mammography screening, these findings suggest a more complex relationship that should be considered when developing interventions to improve adherence to mammography screening guidelines.

PMID:
15598767
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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