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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Jul;85(7):1043-9.

A prehabilitation program for the prevention of functional decline: effect on higher-level physical function.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Adler Geriatric Assessment Center, Yale University School of Medicine, 20 York Street, 17B TMP, New Haven, CT 06504, USA. gill@ynhh.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether a home-based physical therapy (PT) program prevented decline in several higher-level measures of physical function among physically frail, community-living older persons.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

General community.

PARTICIPANTS:

Persons (N=188) who were physically frail and aged 75 years or older.

INTERVENTION:

A home-based PT program (ie, prehabilitation) that focused primarily on improving underlying impairments in physical capabilities.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-reported instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs); mobility, as determined by a modified version of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment; timed rapid gait and timed chair stands; and integrated physical performance, as determined by a modified version of the Physical Performance Test, were assessed at baseline, 7 months, and 12 months.

RESULTS:

As compared with participants in the educational control group, participants in the intervention group had reductions in IADL disability of 17.7% at 7 months (P=.036) and 12.0% at 12 months (P=.143) and had gains, ranging from 7.2% to 15.6%, in mobility and integrated physical performance at 7 and 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our home-based prehabilitation program offered modest but consistent benefits for the prevention of decline in several higher-level measures of physical function.

PMID:
15241748
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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