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Am J Med. 2016 May;129(5):468-75. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2015.08.039. Epub 2015 Nov 11.

Practical Management Guide for Clinicians Who Treat Patients with Amiodarone.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Division, Electrophysiology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Electronic address: andrew.epstein@uphs.upenn.edu.
2
Mercy Hospital-North Iowa, Mason City.
3
Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn State University, Hershey, Pa.
4
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Ala; Department of Medicine, Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Ala.
5
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Calif; Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, Calif.
6
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Calif; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, Calif.

Abstract

Amiodarone, an iodinated benzofuran derivative with Class I, II, III, and IV antiarrhythmic properties, is the most commonly used antiarrhythmic drug used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Appropriate use of this drug, with its severe and potentially life-threatening adverse effects, requires an essential understanding of its risk-benefit properties in order to ensure safety. The objective of this review is to afford clinicians who treat patients receiving amiodarone an appropriate management strategy for its safe use. The authors of this consensus management guide have thoroughly reviewed and evaluated the existing literature on amiodarone and apply this information, along with the collective experience of the authors, in its development. Provided are management guides on the intravenous and oral dosing of amiodarone, appropriate outpatient follow-up of patients taking the drug, its recognized adverse effects, and recommendations on when to consult specialists to help in patient management. All clinicians must be cognizant of the appropriate use, follow-up, and adverse reactions of amiodarone. The responsibility incurred by those treating such patients cannot be overemphasized.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse drug reactions; Amiodarone; Atrial fibrillation; Ventricular fibrillation; Ventricular tachycardia

PMID:
26497904
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjmed.2015.08.039
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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