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J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Nov;40(11):4172-9.

Single and combination antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic, adherent, and biofilm-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates cultured from sputa of adults with cystic fibrosis.

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1
Departments of Medicine, The Ottawa Health Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. saaron@ottawahospital.on.ca

Abstract

Evidence suggests that Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria form biofilms within the airways of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). The objective of this study was to determine whether clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from adults with CF have similar susceptibilities to individual antibiotics and to antibiotic combinations when grown as adherent monolayers or as biofilms compared to when they are grown using planktonic methods. Twelve multiresistant P. aeruginosa isolates, one mucoid and one nonmucoid from each of six CF patients, were grown conventionally under planktonic conditions, as adherent bacterial monolayers, and as biofilms. Each bacterial isolate remained genotypically identical despite being cultured under planktonic, adherent, or biofilm growth conditions. Isolates grown as adherent monolayers and as biofilms were less susceptible to bactericidal killing by individual antibiotics compared to those grown planktonically. More importantly, biofilm-grown bacteria, but not adherent monolayer-grown bacteria, were significantly less susceptible to two- and three-drug combinations of antibiotics than were planktonically grown bacteria (P = 0.005). We conclude that biofilm-grown bacteria derived from patients with CF show decreased susceptibility to the bactericidal effects of antibiotic combinations than do adherent and planktonically grown bacteria.

PMID:
12409393
PMCID:
PMC139693
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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