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Cancer. 2016 Jan 15;122(2):269-77. doi: 10.1002/cncr.29595. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

New York Citywide Colon Cancer Control Coalition: A public health effort to increase colon cancer screening and address health disparities.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
2
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
3
Gastroenterology and Nutrition Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
4
Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York.
5
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York.
6
Department of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York.
7
Department of Surgery, State University of New York Health Sciences Center, Brooklyn, New York.
8
VA Brooklyn Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) is a widely accepted concept nationally and screening rates are increasing, there are differences in screening rates between states and within states.

METHODS:

In an effort to increase screening rates and ensure equal access with respect to race/ethnicity, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene formed a coalition of stakeholders in 2003, with its primary focus on colonoscopy, to develop and implement strategies across the city to achieve this goal.

RESULTS:

From a screening colonoscopy rate of only 42% in 2003, these concerted efforts contributed to achieving a screening rate of 62% by 2007 and a screening rate of almost 70% in 2014 with the elimination of racial and ethnic disparities.

CONCLUSIONS:

This article provides details of how this program was successfully conceived, implemented, and sustained in the large urban population of New York City. The authors hope that by sharing the many elements involved and the lessons learned, they may help other communities to adapt these experiences to their own environments so that CRC screening rates can be maximized. Cancer 2016;122:269-277. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

KEYWORDS:

colorectal cancer; colorectal cancer prevention; colorectal cancer screening; screening colonoscopy

PMID:
26595055
PMCID:
PMC4939480
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.29595
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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