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Mol Cell Biol. 2002 Jun;22(11):3875-91.

Role of SHP-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-mediated suppression of myogenesis in C2C12 myoblasts.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8066, USA.

Abstract

Ligand activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) represses myogenesis and promotes activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erks). The precise mechanism through which the FGFR transmits both of these signals in myoblasts remains unclear. The SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-2, has been shown to participate in the regulation of FGFR signaling. However, no role for SHP-2 in FGFR myogenic signaling is known. In this study, we show that stimulation of C2C12 myoblasts with FGF-2 induces SHP-2 complex formation with tyrosyl-phosphorylated FGFR substrate 2 alpha (FRS-2 alpha). Both the catalytic activity and, to a much lesser extent, the Grb2 binding-tyrosyl phosphorylation sites of SHP-2 are required for maximal FGF-2-induced Erk activity and Elk-1 transactivation. When overexpressed in C2C12 myoblasts, wild-type SHP-2, but not a catalytically inactive SHP-2 mutant, potentiates the suppressive effects of FGF-2 on muscle-specific gene expression. In addition, expression of a constitutively active mutant of SHP-2 is sufficient to prevent myogenesis. The constitutively active mutant of SHP-2 induces hyper-tyrosyl phosphorylation of FRS-2 alpha but fails to stimulate or potentiate either FGF-2-induced Erk activation or Elk-1 transactivation. These data suggest that in myoblasts, SHP-2 represses myogenesis via a pathway that is independent of the Erks. We propose that SHP-2 plays a pivotal role in FGFR signaling in myoblasts via both Erk-dependent and Erk-independent pathways.

PMID:
11997521
PMCID:
PMC133814
DOI:
10.1128/mcb.22.11.3875-3891.2002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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