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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Jul;122:52-59. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.03.033. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Validation of the Egyptian Arabic Assessment of Auditory Skills development using children with Cochlear Implants.

Author information

1
Phoniatrics Faculty of Medicine, 1 Saraya Almanial Street, Phoniatric Unit, Kasr Alaini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: hossam20@msn.com.
2
Phoniatrics Faculty of Medicine, 1 Saraya Almanial Street, Phoniatric Unit, Kasr Alaini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: docazza2004@yahoo.com.
3
Phoniatrics Faculty of Medicine, 1 Saraya Almanial Street, Phoniatric Unit, Kasr Alaini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: ayasheikhany@gmail.com.
4
Student's Hospital, 1 Saraya Almanial Street, Phoniatric Unit, Kasr Alaini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: lailaelmeshmeshy@gmail.com.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Audition is the gateway to spoken language, and infants' early accomplishments in acquiring the sound structure of their native language lays a critical ground work for subsequent learning. The development of pre-lingual auditory perceptual skills for cochlear implanted children is crucial for initial development of oral language.

OBJECTIVE:

The aims of the present study were to validate the Egyptian Arabic Assessment of Auditory Skills, and to track the development of auditory skills in Egyptian children fitted with CI during the first three years post implantation.

METHODS:

The study included 90 Arabic Egyptian children attending the phoniatric unit, Kasr El Aini hospital. Their chronological age ranged from 36 to 72 months. The study lasted for 18 months from July 2015 to January 2017. The children were divided into six groups according to their cochlear age i.e., amount of implant experience. An Arabic assessment chart of auditory skills was tailored that included six auditory skills' domains; detection, identification, short term auditory memory, supra-segmental discrimination, segmental discrimination and linguistic auditory processing. This chart was then used to develop an assessment tool which was then applied to all the study participants. All children had bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SNHL) since birth. None of the participants had prior Cochlear Implant (CI), but all had tried conventional hearing aids. All participants were implanted unilateral, with CI devices. All met selection criteria applied in the Egyptian national insurance committee for cochlear implantation.

RESULTS:

All auditory skills domains improved with cochlear age. There was significant improvement between 1-6 and 7-12 months in the scores of the Detection (DET) domain. There was significant difference between 1-6 and 7-12 months, 7-12 and 13-18 months, 19-24 and 25-30 months in the scores of the Identification (IDENT) domain. Regarding the Short Term Auditory Memory (STAM) domain scores and the Supra-segmental Discrimination (SSD) domain scores there was significant difference between all the groups. Regarding the Segmental Discrimination (SGD) domain scores, there was significant difference between group 1-6 and 7-12 months, 7-12 and 13-18 months, 19-24 and 25-30 months, 25-30 and 31-36 months. Regarding the Linguistic Auditory Processing (LAP) domain, there was significant difference between group 1-6 and 7-12 months, 7-12 and 13-18 months, 25-30 and 31-36 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children fitted with Cochlear Implants (CIs) appeared to show improvement in acquisition of auditory skills over a period of three years that followed a hierarchy of development dependent on the cochlear age.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment; Auditory skills; Children; Cochlear implantation; Hearing impairment

PMID:
30974335
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.03.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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