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Am J Prev Med. 2020 Feb;58(2):182-190. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.07.028. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Association of E-Cigarette Use With Respiratory Disease Among Adults: A Longitudinal Analysis.

Author information

1
Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
2
Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. Electronic address: stanton.glantz@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

E-cigarettes deliver an aerosol of nicotine by heating a liquid and are promoted as an alternative to combustible tobacco. This study determines the longitudinal associations between e-cigarette use and respiratory disease controlling for combustible tobacco use.

METHODS:

This was a longitudinal analysis of the adult Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Waves 1, 2, and 3. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine the associations between e-cigarette use and respiratory disease, controlling for combustible tobacco smoking, demographic, and clinical variables. Data were collected in 2013-2016 and analyzed in 2018-2019.

RESULTS:

Among people who did not report respiratory disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or asthma) at Wave 1, the longitudinal analysis revealed statistically significant associations between former e-cigarette use (AOR=1.31, 95% CI=1.07, 1.60) and current e-cigarette use (AOR=1.29, 95% CI=1.03, 1.61) at Wave 1 and having incident respiratory disease at Waves 2 or 3, controlling for combustible tobacco smoking, demographic, and clinical variables. Current combustible tobacco smoking (AOR=2.56, 95% CI=1.92, 3.41) was also significantly associated with having respiratory disease at Waves 2 or 3. Odds of developing respiratory disease for a current dual user (e-cigarette and all combustible tobacco) were 3.30 compared with a never smoker who never used e-cigarettes. Analysis controlling for cigarette smoking alone yielded similar results.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of e-cigarettes is an independent risk factor for respiratory disease in addition to combustible tobacco smoking. Dual use, the most common use pattern, is riskier than using either product alone.

PMID:
31859175
PMCID:
PMC6981012
[Available on 2021-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2019.07.028

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