Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

J Hosp Infect. 2018 Nov;100(3):344-349. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2018.05.015. Epub 2018 May 25.

Frequent MRSA nasal colonization among hospitalized children and their parents in Angola and São Tomé and Príncipe.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras, Portugal.
2
Escola Superior de Saúde da Cruz Vermelha Portuguesa, Lisboa, Portugal.
3
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras, Portugal; Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The Rockefeller University, New York, USA.
4
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras, Portugal; Escola Superior de Saúde da Cruz Vermelha Portuguesa, Lisboa, Portugal. Electronic address: msousa@esscvp.eu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of nosocomial meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was previously estimated as 23% in a paediatric hospital in Luanda, Angola and 18% in a general hospital in São Tomé and Príncipe.

AIM:

To evaluate the prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA colonization among hospitalized children and their parents at two hospitals in Angola and São Tomé and Príncipe.

METHODS:

In 2017, 127 hospitalized children and 129 of their parents had nasal swabs for S. aureus/MRSA carriage in the two countries. The isolates were tested for the presence of the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, and characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multi-locus sequence typing and SCCmec typing.

FINDINGS:

Twenty of 127 children (15.7%) and 13 of 129 parents (10.1%) were MRSA nasal carriers. Three lineages comprised 88% of the MRSA isolates: (i) PFGE A-ST5-SCCmec IVa (N=15; 45%), associated with spa type t105, recovered in Angola alone; (ii) PFGE N-ST8-IV/V (N=7; 21%), associated with spa types t008/t121, recovered in São Tomé and Príncipe alone; and (iii) PFGE B-ST88-IVa (N=7; 21%), associated with spa types t325/t786, present in both countries. Fifteen child/guardian pairs were colonized with identical MRSA (N=8) or meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (N=7) strains. PVL was detected in 25% of isolates, including two MRSA (ST30-V and ST8-IVa).

CONCLUSION:

Hospitalized children and their parents are important reservoirs of MRSA. Infection control measures should focus on parents in order to minimize the spread of MRSA to the community.

KEYWORDS:

Africa; Angola; Children; MRSA; Nasal carriage; Parents; São Tomé and Príncipe

PMID:
29807064
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2018.05.015

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for Rockefeller University Rita and Frits Markus Library
Loading ...
Support Center