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Am Heart J. 2005 Oct;150(4):814-20.

Acute hyperglycemia is associated with adverse outcome after acute myocardial infarction in the coronary intervention era.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Hiroshima City Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. ishifami@fb3.so-net.ne.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was undertaken to assess the association between acute hyperglycemia and inhospital outcome after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) era. We also assessed outcome of patients with a history of diabetes mellitus in the PCI era.

METHODS:

Between January 2001 and December 2001, 1253 patients were admitted to the hospitals within 48 hours after the onset of AMI. Plasma glucose was measured at hospital admission. Acute hyperglycemia was defined as plasma glucose of > 11 mmol/L (198 mg/dL), regardless of the diabetic status. Primary PCI was performed in 898 (72%) patients.

RESULTS:

The inhospital mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with acute hyperglycemia than in patients without (16% vs 6%, P < .001). However, there was no significant difference in mortality between diabetic and nondiabetic patients (8% vs 9%, P = .54). Acute hyperglycemia was associated with a higher inhospital mortality rate both in nondiabetic patients (24% vs 6%, P < .001) and in diabetic patients (10% vs 5%, P = .039). Acute hyperglycemia was associated with a higher incidence of no reflow during PCI (21% vs 12%, P < .001), but diabetes was not (14% vs 15%, P = .71).

CONCLUSION:

Acute hyperglycemia, but not diabetes, was a predictor for inhospital mortality after AMI in the PCI era. No reflow occurred more frequently during PCI in patients with acute hyperglycemia, suggesting that microvascular dysfunction might have contributed to adverse outcome of these patients.

PMID:
16209987
DOI:
10.1016/j.ahj.2004.12.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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