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Hypertension. 1988 Aug;12(2):129-32.

Attenuation of fructose-induced hypertension in rats by exercise training.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.

Abstract

This study was initiated to see if the insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension that follow feeding normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats a fructose-rich diet could be prevented by letting rats run spontaneously in exercise wheel cages. Blood pressure in sedentary rats increased from (mean +/- SEM) 125 +/- 2 to 148 +/- 3 mm Hg in response to 2 weeks of a high fructose diet, and this increment was significantly (p less than 0.001) attenuated in exercising rats (from 121 +/- 1 to 131 +/- 2 mm Hg). In addition, mean (+/- SEM) plasma insulin concentration was lower in fructose-fed rats allowed to run spontaneously (44 +/- 2 vs 62 +/- 5 microU/ml; p less than 0.01). Finally, resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was assessed by determining the steady state plasma glucose response to a continuous glucose and exogenous insulin infusion during a period in which endogenous insulin secretion was suppressed. The results of these studies indicated that the mean (+/- SEM) steady state plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower in the exercise-trained rats (127 +/- 5 vs 168 +/- 6 mg/dl; p less than 0.001), despite the fact that the steady state plasma insulin levels were also lower in rats allowed to run spontaneously (75 +/- 4 vs 90 +/- 5 microU/ml; p less than 0.05). Thus, the ability of exercise-trained rats to stimulate glucose disposal was enhanced as compared with that of sedentary rats fed the same fructose-rich diet. These data demonstrate that the insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertension produced in normotensive rats by feeding them a high fructose diet can be attenuated if rats are allowed to run spontaneously.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
3410522
DOI:
10.1161/01.hyp.12.2.129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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