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Am J Disaster Med. 2012 Fall;7(4):303-12. doi: 10.5055/ajdm.2012.0103.

Participatory public health systems research: value of community involvement in a study series in mental health emergency preparedness.

Author information

1
Department of Mental Health, Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center, Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Concerns have arisen over recent years about the absence of empirically derived evidence on which to base policy and practice in the public health system, in general, and to meet the challenge of public health emergency preparedness, in particular. Related issues include the challenge of disaster-caused, behavioral health surge, and the frequent exclusion of populations from studies that the research is meant to aid.

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize the contributions of nonacademic collaborators to a series of projects validating a set of interventions to enhance capacity and competency of public mental health preparedness planning and response.

METHODS:

SETTING(S):

Urban, suburban, and rural communities of the state of Maryland and rural communities of the state of Iowa.

PARTICIPANTS:

Study partners and participants (both of this project and the studies examined) were representatives of academic health centers (AHCs), local health departments (LHDs), and faith-based organizations (FBOs) and their communities.

PROCEDURES:

A multiple-project, case study analysis was conducted, that is, four research projects implemented by the authors from 2005 through 2011 to determine the types and impact of contributions made by nonacademic collaborators to those projects. The analysis involved reviewing research records, conceptualizing contributions (and providing examples) for government, faith, and (nonacademic) institutional collaborators.

RESULTS:

Ten areas were identified where partners made valuable contributions to the study series; these "value-areas" were as follows: 1) leadership and management of the projects; 2) formulation and refinement of research topics, aims, etc; 3) recruitment and retention of participants; 4) design and enhancement of interventions; 5) delivery of interventions; 6) collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; 7) dissemination of findings; 8) ensuring sustainability of faith/government preparedness planning relationships; 9) optimizing scalability and portability of the model; and 10) facilitating translational impact of study findings.

CONCLUSIONS:

Systems-based partnerships among academic, faith, and government entities offer an especially promising infrastructure for conducting participatory public health systems research in domestic emergency preparedness and response.

PMID:
23264278
DOI:
10.5055/ajdm.2012.0103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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