Format

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatrics. 2012 Apr;129(4):609-16. doi: 10.1542/peds.2011-2866. Epub 2012 Mar 26.

The national Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program, 1994-2008.

Author information

  • 1Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. esmith6@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the trends and outcomes of the national Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program (PHBPP) for infants born from 1994 to 2008.

METHODS:

PHBPPs in state and city public health jurisdictions annually submitted program outcome reports to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The annual number of births to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive women was estimated and used to evaluate the percentage of PHBPP-identified HBsAg-positive pregnant women. PHBPP reports were used to assess program objectives achieved, and infant outcomes by 12 to 24 months of age.

RESULTS:

From 1994 to 2008, the estimated number of annual births to HBsAg-positive women increased from 19 208 to 25 600 (P < .001). The annual number of PHBPP-managed infants increased (P < .001), comprising 40.8% to 50.5% of the estimated number. On average, 94.4% of PHBPP-managed infants received hepatitis B immunoglobulin and hepatitis B vaccine within 1 day of birth. The percentage of infants who completed the vaccine series by age 12 months decreased from 86.0% to 77.7% (P = .004), but the percentage who received postvaccination testing increased from 25.1% to 56.0% (P < .001). Incidence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among tested infants decreased from 2.1% in 1999 to 0.8% in 2008 (P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The PHBPP achieved substantial progress in preventing perinatal hepatitis B virus infection in the United States, despite an increasing number of at-risk infants. Significant gaps remain in identifying HBsAg-positive pregnant women, and completing management and assessment of their infants to ensure prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk