Format

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Int Assoc Physicians AIDS Care (Chic). 2011 May-Jun;10(3):160-70. doi: 10.1177/1545109711402213. Epub 2011 Apr 20.

The Clinical Significance of CD4 Counts in Asian and Caucasian HIV-Infected Populations: Results from TAHOD and AHOD.

Author information

1
National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Sydney, Australia, aachhra@nchecr.unsw.edu.au.

Abstract

The significance of interethnic variation in CD4 counts between Asian and Caucasian populations is not known. Patients on combination antiretroviral therapy from Treat Asia and Australian HIV Observational Databases (TAHOD, predominantly Asian, n = 3356; and AHOD, predominantly Caucasian, n = 2312, respectively) were followed for 23 144 person-years for AIDS/death and all-cause mortality endpoints. We calculated incidence-rates and used adjusted Cox regression to test for the interaction between cohort (TAHOD/AHOD) and time-updated CD4 count category (lagged by 3 months) for each of the endpoints. There were 382 AIDS/death events in TAHOD (rate: 4.06, 95%CI: 3.68-4.50) and 305 in AHOD (rate: 2.39, 95%CI: 2.13-2.67), per 100 person-years. At any given CD4 count category, the incidence-rates of endpoints were found to be similar between TAHOD and AHOD (in the adjusted models, P > .05 for the interaction term between cohort type and latest CD4 counts). At any given CD4 count, risk of AIDS or death was not found to vary by ethnicity, suggesting that the CD4 count thresholds for predicting outcomes defined in Caucasian populations may be equally valid in Asian populations.

PMID:
21508296
PMCID:
PMC3337854
DOI:
10.1177/1545109711402213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center