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Items: 7

1.

Lack of CXC chemokine receptor 3 signaling leads to hypertrophic and hypercellular scarring.

Yates CC, Krishna P, Whaley D, Bodnar R, Turner T, Wells A.

Am J Pathol. 2010 Apr;176(4):1743-55. doi: 10.2353/ajpath.2010.090564. Epub 2010 Mar 4.

2.

Skin wound healing and scarring: fetal wounds and regenerative restitution.

Yates CC, Hebda P, Wells A.

Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. 2012 Dec;96(4):325-33. doi: 10.1002/bdrc.21024. Review.

3.

Scar-free healing: from embryonic mechanisms to adult therapeutic intervention.

Ferguson MW, O'Kane S.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2004 May 29;359(1445):839-50. Review.

4.

The Beginning of the End: CXCR3 Signaling in Late-Stage Wound Healing.

Huen AC, Wells A.

Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle). 2012 Dec;1(6):244-248. Review.

5.

Control of wound contraction. Basic and clinical features.

Nedelec B, Ghahary A, Scott PG, Tredget EE.

Hand Clin. 2000 May;16(2):289-302. Review.

PMID:
10791174
6.

Matrix control of scarring.

Yates CC, Bodnar R, Wells A.

Cell Mol Life Sci. 2011 Jun;68(11):1871-81. doi: 10.1007/s00018-011-0663-0. Epub 2011 Mar 10. Review.

7.

Role of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibition in cutaneous wound healing and allergic contact hypersensitivity.

Pilcher BK, Wang M, Qin XJ, Parks WC, Senior RM, Welgus HG.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1999 Jun 30;878:12-24. Review.

PMID:
10415717

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