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Items: 1 to 20 of 37

1.

Innate immune response during Yersinia infection: critical modulation of cell death mechanisms through phagocyte activation.

Bergsbaken T, Cookson BT.

J Leukoc Biol. 2009 Nov;86(5):1153-8. doi: 10.1189/jlb.0309146. Review.

2.

Turning Yersinia pathogenesis outside in: subversion of macrophage function by intracellular yersiniae.

Pujol C, Bliska JB.

Clin Immunol. 2005 Mar;114(3):216-26. Review.

PMID:
15721832
3.

Yersinia versus host immunity: how a pathogen evades or triggers a protective response.

Chung LK, Bliska JB.

Curr Opin Microbiol. 2016 Feb;29:56-62. doi: 10.1016/j.mib.2015.11.001. Review.

4.

[Enteropathogenic Yersinia and host cytokine system].

Zheleznikova GF, Bekhtereva MK.

Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2010 Nov-Dec;(6):112-21. Review. Russian.

PMID:
21384597
5.

[Ecological interactions among Yersinia in their common reservoir, the rodent].

Alonso JM.

Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1999 Dec;92(5 Pt 2):414-7. Review. French.

PMID:
11000952
6.

The evolution of flea-borne transmission in Yersinia pestis.

Hinnebusch BJ.

Curr Issues Mol Biol. 2005 Jul;7(2):197-212. Review.

7.

Bubonic plague: a molecular genetic case history of the emergence of an infectious disease.

Hinnebusch BJ.

J Mol Med (Berl). 1997 Sep;75(9):645-52. Review.

PMID:
9351703
8.

Role of immune response in Yersinia pestis infection.

Amedei A, Niccolai E, Marino L, D'Elios MM.

J Infect Dev Ctries. 2011 Sep 14;5(9):628-39. Review.

9.

Cell death programs in Yersinia immunity and pathogenesis.

Philip NH, Brodsky IE.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2012 Nov 30;2:149. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2012.00149. Review.

10.

Yersinia pestis and plague.

Titball RW, Hill J, Lawton DG, Brown KA.

Biochem Soc Trans. 2003 Feb;31(Pt 1):104-7. Review.

PMID:
12546664
11.

Yersinia outer proteins: role in modulation of host cell signaling responses and pathogenesis.

Viboud GI, Bliska JB.

Annu Rev Microbiol. 2005;59:69-89. Review.

PMID:
15847602
12.

[Modern concepts on the relationship between the agents causing plague and pseudotuberculosis].

Kukleva LM, Protsenko OA, Kutyrev VV.

Mol Gen Mikrobiol Virusol. 2002;(1):3-7. Review. Russian.

PMID:
11904922
13.

[Pathogenic properties of Yersinia and their role in yersiniosis pathology].

Daĭter AB, Polotskiĭ IuE, Tseneva GIa.

Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):108-15. Review. Russian. No abstract available.

PMID:
3554847
14.

Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses.

Pha K, Navarro L.

World J Biol Chem. 2016 Feb 26;7(1):1-13. doi: 10.4331/wjbc.v7.i1.1. Review.

15.

Formation and regulation of Yersinia biofilms.

Zhou D, Yang R.

Protein Cell. 2011 Mar;2(3):173-9. doi: 10.1007/s13238-011-1024-3. Review.

16.

Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae.

Heroven AK, Dersch P.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2014 Oct 20;4:146. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2014.00146. Review.

17.

Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection: a regulatory RNA perspective.

Martínez-Chavarría LC, Vadyvaloo V.

Front Microbiol. 2015 Sep 17;6:956. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2015.00956. Review.

18.

Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria.

Cunha LD, Zamboni DS.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2013 Nov 26;3:76. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2013.00076. Review.

19.

Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences.

Atkinson S, Williams P.

F1000Res. 2016 Jun 14;5. pii: F1000 Faculty Rev-1370. doi: 10.12688/f1000research.8466.1. Review.

20.

Yersinia pestis: mechanisms of entry into and resistance to the host cell.

Ke Y, Chen Z, Yang R.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2013 Dec 24;3:106. doi: 10.3389/fcimb.2013.00106. Review.

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