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Items: 18

1.

Effects of the menopause transition and hormone use on cognitive performance in midlife women.

Greendale GA, Huang MH, Wight RG, Seeman T, Luetters C, Avis NE, Johnston J, Karlamangla AS.

Neurology. 2009 May 26;72(21):1850-7. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a71193.

2.

Effects of endogenous and exogenous estrogen exposures in midlife and late-life women on episodic memory and executive functions.

Henderson VW, Popat RA.

Neuroscience. 2011 Sep 15;191:129-38. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.05.059. Epub 2011 Jun 6. Review.

PMID:
21664950
3.

Hormone replacement therapy for cognitive function in postmenopausal women.

Hogervorst E, Yaffe K, Richards M, Huppert F.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(3):CD003122. Review. Update in: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(1):CD003122.

PMID:
12137675
4.

Hormone replacement therapy to maintain cognitive function in women with dementia.

Hogervorst E, Yaffe K, Richards M, Huppert F.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(3):CD003799. Review. Update in: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(1):CD003799.

PMID:
12137718
5.

Surgical versus natural menopause: cognitive issues.

Henderson VW, Sherwin BB.

Menopause. 2007 May-Jun;14(3 Pt 2):572-9. Review.

PMID:
17476147
6.

Gonadal hormones and cognitive aging: a midlife perspective.

Henderson VW.

Womens Health (Lond). 2011 Jan;7(1):81-93. doi: 10.2217/whe.10.87. Review.

7.

Cognitive changes after menopause: influence of estrogen.

Henderson VW.

Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Sep;51(3):618-26. doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e318180ba10. Review.

8.

Cognition and cognitive aging.

Henderson VW.

Climacteric. 2007 Oct;10 Suppl 2:88-91. Review.

PMID:
17882681
9.

Action of estrogens in the aging brain: dementia and cognitive aging.

Henderson VW.

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2010 Oct;1800(10):1077-83. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2009.11.005. Epub 2009 Nov 12. Review.

PMID:
19913598
10.

Surgical menopause and cognitive decline.

Pines A.

Climacteric. 2014 Oct;17(5):580-2. doi: 10.3109/13697137.2014.883244. Epub 2014 Feb 6. Review.

PMID:
24502814
11.

Cognition and mood in perimenopause: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Weber MT, Maki PM, McDermott MP.

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2014 Jul;142:90-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2013.06.001. Epub 2013 Jun 14. Review.

12.

Aging, estrogens, and episodic memory in women.

Henderson VW.

Cogn Behav Neurol. 2009 Dec;22(4):205-14. doi: 10.1097/WNN.0b013e3181a74ce7. Review.

13.

Oophorectomy, menopause, estrogen treatment, and cognitive aging: clinical evidence for a window of opportunity.

Rocca WA, Grossardt BR, Shuster LT.

Brain Res. 2011 Mar 16;1379:188-98. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2010.10.031. Epub 2010 Oct 18. Review.

14.

Estrogen and cognitive functioning in women: lessons we have learned.

Sherwin BB.

Behav Neurosci. 2012 Feb;126(1):123-7. doi: 10.1037/a0025539. Epub 2011 Oct 17. Review.

15.

Hormonic convergence. Finding balance through hormone replacement therapy.

Cotter VT.

AWHONN Lifelines. 1997 Feb;1(1):37-42. Review.

PMID:
9223947
16.

Can estrogen keep you smart? Evidence from clinical studies.

Sherwin BB.

J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1999 Sep;24(4):315-21. Review.

17.

Estrogen therapy: is time of initiation critical for neuroprotection?

Sherwin BB.

Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2009 Nov;5(11):620-7. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2009.193. Review.

PMID:
19844249
18.

Estradiol and cognitive function: past, present and future.

Luine VN.

Horm Behav. 2014 Sep;66(4):602-18. doi: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2014.08.011. Epub 2014 Sep 7. Review.

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