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Items: 19

1.

Traumatic brain injury causes a long-lasting calcium (Ca2+)-plateau of elevated intracellular Ca levels and altered Ca2+ homeostatic mechanisms in hippocampal neurons surviving brain injury.

Sun DA, Deshpande LS, Sombati S, Baranova A, Wilson MS, Hamm RJ, DeLorenzo RJ.

Eur J Neurosci. 2008 Apr;27(7):1659-72. doi: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2008.06156.x.

2.

IGF-1/IGF-R Signaling in Traumatic Brain Injury: Impact on Cell Survival, Neurogenesis, and Behavioral Outcome.

Madathil SK, Saatman KE.

In: Kobeissy FH, editor. Brain Neurotrauma: Molecular, Neuropsychological, and Rehabilitation Aspects. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2015. Chapter 7.

3.

Cellular mechanisms underlying acquired epilepsy: the calcium hypothesis of the induction and maintainance of epilepsy.

Delorenzo RJ, Sun DA, Deshpande LS.

Pharmacol Ther. 2005 Mar;105(3):229-66. Review. Erratum in: Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Jul;111(1):287. Corrected and republished in: Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Jul;111(1):288-325.

4.

Altered calcium signaling and neuronal injury: stroke and Alzheimer's disease as examples.

Mattson MP, Rydel RE, Lieberburg I, Smith-Swintosky VL.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1993 May 28;679:1-21. Review.

PMID:
8512177
6.

Role of Microvascular Disruption in Brain Damage from Traumatic Brain Injury.

Logsdon AF, Lucke-Wold BP, Turner RC, Huber JD, Rosen CL, Simpkins JW.

Compr Physiol. 2015 Jul 1;5(3):1147-60. doi: 10.1002/cphy.c140057. Review.

7.

Calcium buffering systems and calcium signaling in aged rat basal forebrain neurons.

Murchison D, Griffith WH.

Aging Cell. 2007 Jun;6(3):297-305. Review.

8.

Neuroinflammation in animal models of traumatic brain injury.

Chiu CC, Liao YE, Yang LY, Wang JY, Tweedie D, Karnati HK, Greig NH, Wang JY.

J Neurosci Methods. 2016 Oct 15;272:38-49. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2016.06.018. Review.

9.

Glutamate and GABA imbalance following traumatic brain injury.

Guerriero RM, Giza CC, Rotenberg A.

Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2015 May;15(5):27. doi: 10.1007/s11910-015-0545-1. Review.

10.

Injury-induced alterations in CNS electrophysiology.

Cohen AS, Pfister BJ, Schwarzbach E, Grady MS, Goforth PB, Satin LS.

Prog Brain Res. 2007;161:143-69. Review.

PMID:
17618975
11.

Traumatic Brain Injury and Neuronal Functionality Changes in Sensory Cortex.

Carron SF, Alwis DS, Rajan R.

Front Syst Neurosci. 2016 Jun 2;10:47. doi: 10.3389/fnsys.2016.00047. Review.

12.

Cell death mechanisms and modulation in traumatic brain injury.

Stoica BA, Faden AI.

Neurotherapeutics. 2010 Jan;7(1):3-12. doi: 10.1016/j.nurt.2009.10.023. Review.

13.

Altered calcium homeostasis in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemic and hypoxic injury.

Buja LM, Hagler HK, Willerson JT.

Cell Calcium. 1988 Dec;9(5-6):205-17. Review.

PMID:
3066489
14.

Hippocampal Neurophysiologic Changes after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Potential Neuromodulation Treatment Approaches.

Girgis F, Pace J, Sweet J, Miller JP.

Front Syst Neurosci. 2016 Feb 9;10:8. doi: 10.3389/fnsys.2016.00008. Review.

15.

Alterations in nitric oxide homeostasis during traumatic brain injury.

Kozlov AV, Bahrami S, Redl H, Szabo C.

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2017 Jan 5. pii: S0925-4439(17)30004-2. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2016.12.020. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
28064018
16.

Ca2+ signals and death programmes in neurons.

Berliocchi L, Bano D, Nicotera P.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2005 Dec 29;360(1464):2255-8. Review.

17.

Calcium and normal brain ageing.

Toescu EC, Vreugdenhil M.

Cell Calcium. 2010 Feb;47(2):158-64. doi: 10.1016/j.ceca.2009.11.013. Review.

PMID:
20045187
18.

Multimodal Imaging of Neurometabolic Pathology due to Traumatic Brain Injury.

Van Horn JD, Bhattrai A, Irimia A.

Trends Neurosci. 2017 Jan;40(1):39-59. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2016.10.007. Review.

PMID:
27939821
19.

Neuronal homeostasis: time for a change?

O'Leary T, Wyllie DJ.

J Physiol. 2011 Oct 15;589(Pt 20):4811-26. doi: 10.1113/jphysiol.2011.210179. Review.

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