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Items: 1 to 20 of 123

1.

Tuberous sclerosis complex: linking growth and energy signaling pathways with human disease.

Astrinidis A, Henske EP.

Oncogene. 2005 Nov 14;24(50):7475-81. Review.

PMID:
16288294
2.

Tuberous sclerosis: a GAP at the crossroads of multiple signaling pathways.

Kwiatkowski DJ, Manning BD.

Hum Mol Genet. 2005 Oct 15;14 Spec No. 2:R251-8. Review.

PMID:
16244323
3.

The mTOR/S6K signalling pathway: the role of the TSC1/2 tumour suppressor complex and the proto-oncogene Rheb.

Nobukini T, Thomas G.

Novartis Found Symp. 2004;262:148-54; discussion 154-9, 265-8. Review.

PMID:
15562827
4.

Tuberous sclerosis and the kidney: from mesenchyme to epithelium, and beyond.

Henske EP.

Pediatr Nephrol. 2005 Jul;20(7):854-7. Epub 2005 Apr 26. Review.

PMID:
15856327
5.

The tuberous sclerosis complex genes in tumor development.

Mak BC, Yeung RS.

Cancer Invest. 2004;22(4):588-603. Review.

PMID:
15565817
6.

Tuberous sclerosis as an underlying basis for infantile spasm.

Yeung RS.

Int Rev Neurobiol. 2002;49:315-32. Review.

PMID:
12040899
7.

Metastasis of benign tumor cells in tuberous sclerosis complex.

Henske EP.

Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2003 Dec;38(4):376-81. Review.

PMID:
14566858
8.

Rhebbing up mTOR: new insights on TSC1 and TSC2, and the pathogenesis of tuberous sclerosis.

Kwiatkowski DJ.

Cancer Biol Ther. 2003 Sep-Oct;2(5):471-6. Review.

PMID:
14614311
9.

New developments in the neurobiology of the tuberous sclerosis complex.

Crino PB, Henske EP.

Neurology. 1999 Oct 22;53(7):1384-90. Review.

PMID:
10534239
10.
11.

Regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) function by 14-3-3 proteins.

Nellist M, Goedbloed MA, Halley DJ.

Biochem Soc Trans. 2003 Jun;31(Pt 3):587-91. Review.

PMID:
12773161
12.

Therapeutic targeting of mTOR in tuberous sclerosis.

Sampson JR.

Biochem Soc Trans. 2009 Feb;37(Pt 1):259-64. doi: 10.1042/BST0370259. Review.

PMID:
19143643
13.

Tumour suppressors hamartin and tuberin: intracellular signalling.

Krymskaya VP.

Cell Signal. 2003 Aug;15(8):729-39. Review.

PMID:
12781866
14.

Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM): progress and current challenges.

Goncharova EA, Krymskaya VP.

J Cell Biochem. 2008 Feb 1;103(2):369-82. Review.

PMID:
17541983
15.

The tuberous sclerosis gene products hamartin and tuberin are multifunctional proteins with a wide spectrum of interacting partners.

Rosner M, Hanneder M, Siegel N, Valli A, Hengstschläger M.

Mutat Res. 2008 Mar-Apr;658(3):234-46. doi: 10.1016/j.mrrev.2008.01.001. Epub 2008 Jan 12. Review.

PMID:
18291711
16.

Positive and negative regulation of TSC2 activity and its effects on downstream effectors of the mTOR pathway.

Jozwiak J, Jozwiak S, Grzela T, Lazarczyk M.

Neuromolecular Med. 2005;7(4):287-96. Review.

PMID:
16391386
17.

The role of tuberin in cellular differentiation: are B-Raf and MAPK involved?

Karbowniczek M, Henske EP.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2005 Nov;1059:168-73. Review.

PMID:
16382052
18.

Comprehensive mutation analysis of TSC1 and TSC2-and phenotypic correlations in 150 families with tuberous sclerosis.

Jones AC, Shyamsundar MM, Thomas MW, Maynard J, Idziaszczyk S, Tomkins S, Sampson JR, Cheadle JP.

Am J Hum Genet. 1999 May;64(5):1305-15. Review.

19.

Hamartin and tuberin modulate gene transcription via beta-catenin.

Jozwiak J, Wlodarski P.

J Neurooncol. 2006 Sep;79(3):229-34. Epub 2006 Mar 22. Review.

PMID:
16552619
20.

The tuberous sclerosis complex: balancing proliferation and survival.

Tomasoni R, Mondino A.

Biochem Soc Trans. 2011 Apr;39(2):466-71. doi: 10.1042/BST0390466. Review.

PMID:
21428921

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