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Items: 7

1.

Inability to detect cell free fetal DNA in the urine of normal pregnant women nor in those affected by preeclampsia associated HELLP syndrome.

Li Y, Zhong XY, Kang A, Troeger C, Holzgreve W, Hahn S.

J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2003 Dec;10(8):503-8.

PMID:
14662164
2.

Cell-free DNA in urine: a marker for kidney graft rejection, but not for prenatal diagnosis?

Zhong XY, Hahn D, Troeger C, Klemm A, Stein G, Thomson P, Holzgreve W, Hahn S.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2001 Sep;945:250-7. Review.

PMID:
11708487
3.

The HELLP syndrome in the antiphospholipid syndrome: retrospective study of 16 cases in 15 women.

Le Thi Thuong D, Tieulié N, Costedoat N, Andreu MR, Wechsler B, Vauthier-Brouzes D, Aumaître O, Piette JC.

Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Feb;64(2):273-8. Review.

4.

Fetal cells and cell-free fetal DNA in maternal blood: new insights into pre-eclampsia.

Hahn S, Holzgreve W.

Hum Reprod Update. 2002 Nov-Dec;8(6):501-8. Review.

PMID:
12498420
5.

Circulating fetal DNA: its origin and diagnostic potential-a review.

Bianchi DW.

Placenta. 2004 Apr;25 Suppl A:S93-S101. Review.

PMID:
15033315
6.

Corticosteroids for the syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP): what evidence?

Vidaeff AC, Yeomans ER.

Minerva Ginecol. 2007 Apr;59(2):183-90. Review.

PMID:
17505460
7.

Both maternal and fetal cell-free DNA in plasma fluctuate.

Hahn S, Zhong XY, Bürk MR, Troeger C, Kang A, Holzgreve W.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2001 Sep;945:141-4. Review.

PMID:
11708468

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