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Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002 Sep-Oct;10(5):521-30.

Depressive symptoms and mortality in a prospective study of 2,558 older adults.

Author information

1
Center for Health Services Research, UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute, 10920 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. unutzer@ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The authors report results from a 7-year prospective study of depression and mortality in 2,558 Medicare recipients age 65 and older.

METHODS:

This report is based on a secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the cost-effectiveness of preventive services for older enrollees in an HMO.

RESULTS:

Subjects with mild-to-moderate depression at baseline did not have an increased risk of mortality compared with those without significant depression. The 3% of older adults with the most severe depressive syndromes, however, had significant increases in mortality, even after adjusting for demographics, health risk behaviors, and chronic medical disorders.

CONCLUSION:

The increase in mortality in this group of older adults was comparable to that in participants with chronic medical disorders such as emphysema or heart disease.

PMID:
12213686
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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