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Items: 1 to 20 of 100

1.

Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens.

Steinkellner H, Rabot S, Freywald C, Nobis E, Scharf G, Chabicovsky M, Knasmüller S, Kassie F.

Mutat Res. 2001 Sep 1;480-481:285-97. Review.

PMID:
11506821
2.

Phytochemicals from cruciferous plants protect against cancer by modulating carcinogen metabolism.

Talalay P, Fahey JW.

J Nutr. 2001 Nov;131(11 Suppl):3027S-33S. Review.

3.

Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis.

Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, Dashwood RH.

Pharmacol Res. 2007 Mar;55(3):224-36. Epub 2007 Jan 25. Review.

4.

Cruciferous vegetables: cancer protective mechanisms of glucosinolate hydrolysis products and selenium.

Keck AS, Finley JW.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):5-12. Review.

PMID:
15035868
6.

Chemoprotection by organosulfur inducers of phase 2 enzymes: dithiolethiones and dithiins.

Kensler TW, Curphey TJ, Maxiutenko Y, Roebuck BD.

Drug Metabol Drug Interact. 2000;17(1-4):3-22. Review.

PMID:
11201301
7.

Glucosinolates: bioavailability and importance to health.

Johnson IT.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2002 Jan;72(1):26-31. Review.

PMID:
11887749
8.

[Chemoprevention of tobacco-related lung cancer by cruciferous vegetable].

Balcerek M.

Przegl Lek. 2007;64(10):903-5. Review. Polish.

PMID:
18409338
9.

[Cancer chemopreventive agents: glucosinolates and their decomposition products in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata)].

Smiechowska A, Bartoszek A, Namieśnik J.

Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online). 2008 Apr 2;62:125-40. Review. Polish.

10.

Development and application of test methods for the detection of dietary constituents which protect against heterocyclic aromatic amines.

Kassie F, Sundermann VM, Edenharder R, Platt KL, Darroudi F, Lhoste E, Humbolt C, Muckel E, Uhl M, Kundi M, Knasmüller S.

Mutat Res. 2003 Feb-Mar;523-524:183-92. Review.

PMID:
12628516
11.

Anticarcinogenic activities of organic isothiocyanates: chemistry and mechanisms.

Zhang Y, Talalay P.

Cancer Res. 1994 Apr 1;54(7 Suppl):1976s-1981s. Review.

12.

Modification of carcinogen metabolism by indolylic autolysis products of Brassica oleraceae.

Bradfield CA, Bjeldanes LF.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 1991;289:153-63. Review.

PMID:
1897390
13.

Novel concepts of broccoli sulforaphanes and disease: induction of phase II antioxidant and detoxification enzymes by enhanced-glucoraphanin broccoli.

James D, Devaraj S, Bellur P, Lakkanna S, Vicini J, Boddupalli S.

Nutr Rev. 2012 Nov;70(11):654-65. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2012.00532.x. Epub 2012 Oct 12. Review.

PMID:
23110644
14.

Cruciferous vegetables: dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention.

Abdull Razis AF, Noor NM.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2013;14(3):1565-70. Review.

15.

Dietary modulation of the biotransformation and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B(1).

Gross-Steinmeyer K, Eaton DL.

Toxicology. 2012 Sep 28;299(2-3):69-79. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2012.05.016. Epub 2012 May 26. Review.

PMID:
22640941
17.

A review of mechanisms underlying anticarcinogenicity by brassica vegetables.

Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA, van den Brandt PA, van Poppel G.

Chem Biol Interact. 1997 Feb 28;103(2):79-129. Review.

PMID:
9055870
18.

Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms.

van Poppel G, Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;472:159-68. Review.

PMID:
10736624
19.

Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.

Lynn A, Collins A, Fuller Z, Hillman K, Ratcliffe B.

Proc Nutr Soc. 2006 Feb;65(1):135-44. Review.

PMID:
16441953
20.

Effects of dietary constituents on the metabolism of chemical carcinogens.

Wattenberg LW.

Cancer Res. 1975 Nov;35(11 Pt. 2):3326-31. Review.

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